Last edited by Sajar
Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

2 edition of southern poor-white found in the catalog.

southern poor-white

Shields McIlwaine

southern poor-white

a literary history

by Shields McIlwaine

  • 148 Want to read
  • 2 Currently reading

Published in [Chicago] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Southern States
    • Subjects:
    • Americans in literature.,
    • Southern States -- Social conditions.

    • Edition Notes

      Other titlesPoor-white, The southern.
      Statementby Ardrey Shields McIlwaine...
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsPS173.P7 M29 1937
      The Physical Object
      Pagination1 p. l., p. 188-209. ;
      Number of Pages209
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL6409231M
      LC Control Number40030790
      OCLC/WorldCa10423525

      In their book The Companion to Southern Literature, Joseph Flora and Lucinda MacKethan describe the characteristics of the “redneck,” a stereotype of a particular kind of poor white Southerner that dates back to before the Civil War. Redneck is a derogatory term currently applied to some lower-class and workingclass southerners. The term, which came into common usage in the s, is.   Generally, the view of poor white southerners grew more and more negative, especially in modern mass market movies and television programs, which have often stressed the negative and grotesque. Georgia has borne its full share of this stereotype of lower-class southern whites who share poverty status with immigrants, blacks, and other minorities.

      Two postwar changes dominated Southern life. One was the bewildering new world faced by the freed slaves. The other was a new farming practice, known as sharecropping, that would ultimately make life more difficult for both ex-slaves and poor whites. Starting a new life. For more than 3 million African Americans, the whole of life post–Civil. Poor white Americans’ current crisis shouldn’t have caught the rest of the country as off guard as it has. Sometime during the past few years, the country started talking differently about.

        Smith had already established a national reputation as an unrelenting critic of southern racism with the publication of her controversial novel Strange Fruit in as well as in numerous essays and articles. In the wake of Strange Fruit's success, she decided to elaborate on its themes in nonfiction and in began writing the book that would become Killers of the Dream.   1. The Invisible Poor: Toward a Definition of Southern Poor Whites 2. Dogtrots and Jack Tales: Toward a Definition of Poor White Culture 3. "Lint Heads" and "Diggers": The Forgotten People of the New South, 4. Progress and Poverty, Southern Style: The s and s 5. Southern Poverty Forgotten and Discovered—Again : Indiana University Press.


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Southern poor-white by Shields McIlwaine Download PDF EPUB FB2

An interesting piece of research, nicely handled — recounting the social story of the poor whites and the literary treatment through various periods from the 18th century to Erskine Caldwell.

Crackers, peckerwoods, woolhats, cajuns et al. How this class came to be, isolation breeding ignorance, climate breeding listlessness, plantations and slavery putting stigma on lowly tasks.

Poor Whites of the Antebellum South sheds light on a group often neglected in southern history. It is an important contribution that will be of interest to all students and historians of the American by:   Masterless Men: Poor Whites and Slavery in the Antebellum South is her first book.

She has also co-edited a book on southern labor history with Matthew Hild (Reviving Southern Labor History: Race, Class, and Power, forthcoming).

She is currently conducting research for two additional book-length projects. The southern poor white is one of America's oldest and most enduring folk figures.

His image is an elusive one, compounded of popular prejudice, a rich literary tradition, and myriad sociological investigations; but most typically it derives from the alliance of extreme material deprivation with slyness, sloth, absurd folly, and random violence.

There are few people in this country who know about poor white Communist factory workers attempting to overtake cotton mills in the s and ’30s in the Carolinas, or the names of white Southern activists from the s and ’60s. This kind of information is written out of history — for a very specific political purpose.

Her first book, Masterless Men: Poor Whites and Slavery in the Antebellum South, was published by Cambridge University Press in She has also co-edited a book on southern labor history with Matthew Hild (Reviving Southern Labor History: Race, Class, and Power, forthcoming), and is currently conducting research for two additional books.

One. "One of the book's many strengths is that Merritt tells the story of poor white southerners without downplaying the experiences of black southerners and the brutality of slavery.

"Cited by: In Poor Whites of the Antebellum South, Charles C. Bolton gives a distinct voice to one of the most elusive groups in the society of the Old South. Bolton's detailed examination reveals much about the lives of these landless white tenants and laborers and their relationship to yeoman farmers, black slaves, free blacks and elite whites.

This book does a tremendous job articulating the full social, political, and economic consequences of the Southern slave society for not just enslaved Africans, but for "poor and middling whites." Merritt traces how antebellum slavery degraded the lives of every non-slave holder in the South/5.

There were indentured servants, African slaves, Native Americans, poor white yeoman farmers, and a wealthier landowning aristocracy. Some of the first colonies were owned by wealthy English barons (like the Lords Proprietors in Carolina) and after the Revolution, most states had property requirements that kept the poor whites from voting.

While studies on southern slaveholders, yeomen, and even the enslaved abound, relatively little has been written about the Deep South’s white working-class.

My new book, Masterless Men: Poor Whites and Slavery in the Antebellum South, seeks to illuminate the lives of about one-third of the cotton belt’s whites, who owned neither land nor.

Keri Leigh Merritt. Keri Leigh Merritt is a historian of the 19th-century American South who works as an independent scholar in Atlanta.

She is the author of Masterless Men: Poor Whites and Slavery in the Antebellum South (Cambridge University Press, ) and the co-editor of the forthcoming Reviving Southern Labor History: Race, Class, and Power. The old trope of docility among the Southern underclasses, therefore, is just incorrect.

There was, in fact, a burning desire for freedom and change, but the master class had devised a system so complete and so vicious that the enslaved, free blacks and poor whites were essentially rendered powerless in the face of oppression.

The food of my childhood, the food of Southern poor white trash Septem Ashley F. Miller here comes honey boo boo, poor white trash, redneck cuisine, rednecks, southerners I am having a hard time with all the visceral disgust being aimed at the show Here Comes Honey Boo Boo, because so much of it seems to be just hate aimed at.

Shelves: non-fiction, humor, cooking, southern-fried-southern-lit, own, cookbook For all the humor in this book and the name may be an obvious turn off it is an important cookbook. For most of us we will recognize several of these dishes from our childhood or ethnic background or area of the country and realize we ARE WHITE TRASH.4/5.

InHarry M. Caudill published what is still regarded as a landmark in the study of the poor white South, Night Comes To The Cumberlands. Yet even that book, which takes pains to document how. So, if a poor white woman had a child with a black man, that child would be entitled to legal freedom, adding to the free black population.

So they had the ability to disrupt the racial hierarchy. In Poor Whites of the Antebellum South, Charles C. Bolton gives a distinct voice to one of the most elusive groups in the society of the Old South.

Bolton's detailed examination reveals much about the lives of these landless white tenants and laborers and their relationship to yeoman farmers, black slaves, free blacks and elite : $ Buy a cheap copy of From Tobacco Road to Route The book by Sylvia J.

Cook. In the early nineteenth century, the southern poor white had a reputation for comic vulgarity and absurd violence; postbellum writers saw him as a quaint peasant; Free shipping over $ In The Angelic Mother and the Predatory Seductress, Ashley Craig Lancaster examines how converging political and cultural movements helped to create dualistic images of southern poor white female characters in Depression-era : Ashley Craig Lancaster.

Southern poor-white from Lubberland to Tobacco road. Norman, Okla., University of Oklahoma Press, (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Shields McIlwaine.The University of Chicago Press.

Books Division. Chicago Distribution Center. In his book, Social Relations in Our Southern States, Daniel R. Hundley described poor whites as “”about the laziest two-legged animals that walk erect on the face of the Earth.

Even their motions are slow, and their speech is a sickening drawl while their thoughts and ideas seem likewise to crawl along at a snail’s pace.”.